Franco-Etrangers Index du Forum

Franco-Etrangers
Vivre en France en famille

 FAQFAQ   RechercherRechercher   MembresMembres   GroupesGroupes   S’enregistrerS’enregistrer 
 ProfilProfil   Se connecter pour vérifier ses messages privésSe connecter pour vérifier ses messages privés   ConnexionConnexion 
Site Meter
Nouveaux Guidelines de la Commission Européenne sur l'application de la directive 2004/38 sur le droit de vivre en Europe en famille

 
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Franco-Etrangers Index du Forum -> couples et familles binationales -> La lutte entre les Etats membres et les Institutions Européennes sur le respect du droit de vivre en Europe en famille
Sujet précédent :: Sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
Admin


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 24 Avr 2008
Messages: 1 580

MessagePosté le: Jeu 2 Juil - 18:27 (2009)    Sujet du message: Nouveaux Guidelines de la Commission Européenne sur l'application de la directive 2004/38 sur le droit de vivre en Europe en famille Répondre en citant

Nouveaux Guidelines de la Commission Européenne sur l'application de la directive 2004/38 sur le droit de vivre en Europe en famille

Communication de la commission du 2 juillet 2009 sur l'application de la directive libre circulation

Citation:


Edit 30 juillet 2009

Les guidelines sont désormais disponibles en français.

Fichier pdf :http://eurlex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:52009DC0313:FR:NOT
Texte seul pour copié-collé : http://multinational.leforum.eu/p1183.htm
Fenêtrage scribd :

COM(2009) 313 Lignes Dir. Application Dir 2004 38 - 2 Juillet 2009



Citation:


La communication de la commission du 2 juillet 2009 en anglais
http://www.statewatch.org/news/2009/jul/eu-com-family-members-com-313.pdf

Egalement un bon article de mai 2009 :

Testing the Limits of European Citizenship
Anja Lansbergen, University of Edinburgh
May 2009
http://www.fedtrust.co.uk/admin/uploads/Testing_Limits_of_Citz.pdf



Citation:


COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES

Brussels,
COM(2009) 313/4

COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL

on guidance for better transposition and application of Directive 2004/38/EC on the right of citizens of the Union and their family members to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States





Citation:


1. Introduction

On 10 December 2008, the Commission adopted its report [1] on the application of Directive 2004/38/EC [2] which presented a comprehensive overview of how the Directive is transposed into national law and how it is applied in everyday life.

The report concluded that the overall transposition of the Directive was rather disappointing, particularly as regards Chapter VI (which provides for the right of Member States to restrict the right of EU citizens and their family members on grounds of public policy or public security) and Article 35 (which authorises Member States to adopt measures to prevent abuse and fraud, such as marriages of convenience).

The Commission announced in the report its intention to offer information and assistance to both Member States and EU citizens by issuing guidelines in the first half of 2009 on the issues identified as problematic in transposition or application. This intention was welcomed by the Council [3] and by the European Parliament [4]. The guidelines state the views of the Commission and are without prejudice to the case-law of the Court of Justice “the Court”) and its development.

This Communication aims to provide guidance to Member States on how to apply Directive 2004/38/EC of 29 April 2004 on the right of citizens of the Union and their family members to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States correctly; with the objective of bringing a real improvement for all EU citizens and of making the EU an area of security, freedom and justice.

The report also identified frequent problems relating to the right of entry and residence of third country family members of EU citizens, and to requirements to submit with the applications for residence additional documents not foreseen in the Directive. The Commission announced in the report that it will step up its efforts to ensure that the Directive is correctly transposed and implemented. In order to achieve this objective, the Commission will continue to inform citizens about their rights under the Directive, in particular by distributing a simplified guide for EU citizens and by making the best use of the Internet. Moreover, the Commission will meet Member States bilaterally to discuss issues of implementation and application and will use fully its powers under the Treaty.

Today more than 8 million Union citizens have taken advantage of their right to move and reside freely and now live in another Member State of the Union. The free movement of citizens constitutes one of the fundamental freedoms of the internal market and is at the heart of the European project. Directive 2004/38/EC codified and reviewed the existing Community instruments in order to simplify and strengthen the right of free movement and residence for Union citizens and their family members. As a general remark, the Commission recalls that the Directive must be interpreted and applied in accordance with fundamental rights [5], in particular the right to respect for private and family life, the principle of non-discrimination, the rights of the child and the right to an effective remedy as guaranteed in the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR) and as reflected in the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.

The freedom of movement of persons is one of the foundations of the EU. Consequently derogations from that principle must be interpreted strictly [6]. However, the right of free movement within the EU is not unlimited and carries with it obligations on the part of its beneficiaries, which implies to obey the laws of their host country.




Citation:


2. EU citizens and their third country family members – entry and residence

The Directive [7] applies only to EU citizens who move to or reside in a Member State other than that of which they are a national, and to their family members who accompany or join them.

T., a third country national, resides in the host Member State for some time. She wants to be joined there by her third country spouse. As no EU citizen is involved, the couple cannot benefit from the rights under the Directive and it remains fully up to the Member State concerned to lay down rules on the right of third country spouses to join other third country nationals, taking due account of other instruments of Community law, if applicable.

EU citizens residing in the Member State of their nationality do not normally benefit from the rights granted by Community law on free movement of persons and their third country family members remain to be covered by national immigration rules. However, EU citizens who return to their home Member State after having resided in another Member State [8] and in certain circumstances also those EU citizens who have exercised their rights to free movement in another Member State without residing there [9] (for example by providing services in another Member State without residing there) benefit as well from the rules on free movement of persons.

P. resides in the Member State of his nationality. He likes it there and has not resided in another Member State before. When he wants to bring his third country spouse, the couple cannot benefit from the rights under the Directive and it remains fully up to the Member State concerned to lay down rules on the right of third country spouses to join its own nationals.

Frontier workers are covered by Community law in both countries (as a migrant worker in the Member State of employment and as a self-sufficient person in the Member State of residence).



2.1. Family members and other beneficiaries

2.1.1. Spouses and partners

Marriages validly contracted anywhere in the world must be in principle recognized for the purpose of the application of the Directive. Forced marriages, in which one or both parties is married without his or her consent or against his or her will, are not protected by international [10] or Community law. Forced marriages must be distinguished from arranged marriages, where both parties fully and freely consent to the marriage, although a third party takes a leading role in the choice of partner, and from marriages of convenience, defined in Section 4.2 below.

Member States are not obliged to recognise polygamous marriages, contracted lawfully in a third country, which may be in conflict with their own legal order [11]. This is without prejudice to the obligation to take due account of the best interests of children of such marriages.

The Directive must be applied in accordance with the non-discrimination principle enshrined in particular in Article 21 of the EU Charter.

Partners with whom an EU citizen has a de facto durable relationship, duly attested, are covered by Article 3(2)(b). Persons who derive their rights under the Directive from being durable partners may be required to present documentary evidence that they are partners of an EU citizen and that the partnership is durable. Evidence may be adduced by any appropriate means.

The requirement of durability of the relationship must be assessed in the light of the objective of the Directive to maintain the unity of the family in a broad sense [12]. National rules on durability of partnership can refer to a minimum amount of time as a criterion for whether a partnership can be considered as durable. However, in this case national rules would need to foresee that other relevant aspects (such as for example a joint mortgage to buy a home) are also taken into account. Any denial of entry or residence must be fully justified in writing and open to appeal.

2.1.2. Family members in direct line

Without prejudice to issues related to recognition of decisions of national authorities, the notion of direct relatives in the descending and ascending lines extends to adoptive relationships [13] or minors in custody of a permanent legal guardian. Foster children and foster parents who have temporary custody may have rights under the Directive, depending upon the strength of the ties in the particular case. There is no restriction as to the degree of relatedness. National authorities may request evidence of the claimed family relationship.

In implementing the Directive, Member States must always act in the best interests of the child, as provided for in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child of 20 November 1989.

2.1.3 Other family members

Article 3(2)(a) does not lay down any restrictions as to the degree of relatedness when referring to ‘other family members’.

2.1.4. Dependent family members

According to the case-law [14] of the Court, the status of ‘dependent’ family member is the result of a factual situation characterised by the fact that material support[15] for that family member is provided by the EU citizen or by his spouse/partner. The status of dependent family members does not presuppose a right to maintenance. There is no need to examine whether the family members concerned would in theory be able to support themselves, for example by taking up paid employment.

In order to determine whether family members are dependent, it must be assessed in the individual case whether, having regard to their financial and social conditions, they need material support to meet their essential needs in their country of origin or the country from which they came at the time when they applied to join the EU citizen (i.e. not in the host Member State where the EU citizen resides). In its judgments on the concept of dependency, the Court did not refer to any level of standard of living for determining the need for financial support by the EU citizen [16].

The Directive does not lay down any requirement as to the minimum duration of the dependency or the amount of material support provided, as long as the dependency is genuine and structural in character.

Dependent family members are required to present documentary evidence that they are dependent. Evidence may be adduced by any appropriate means, as confirmed by the Court [17]. Where the family members concerned are able to provide evidence of their dependency by means other than a certifying document issued by the relevant authority of the country of origin or the country from which the family members are arriving, the host Member State may not refuse to recognise their rights. However, a mere undertaking from the EU citizen to support the family member concerned is not sufficient in itself to establish the existence of dependence.

In accordance with Article 3(2), Member States have a certain degree of discretion in laying down criteria to be taken into account when deciding whether to grant the rights under the Directive to "other dependent family members". However, Member States do not enjoy unrestricted liberty in laying down such criteria. In order to maintain the unity of the family in a broad sense, the national legislation must provide for a careful examination of the relevant personal circumstances of the applicants concerned, taking into consideration their relationship with the EU citizen or any other circumstances, such as their financial or physical dependence, as stipulated in Recital 6.

Any negative decision is subject to all the material and procedural safeguards of the Directive. It must be fully justified in writing and open to appeal.



2.2. Entry and residence of third country family members

2.2.1. Entry visas

As provided in Article 5(2), Member States may require third country family members moving with or joining an EU citizen to whom the Directive applies to have an entry visa. Such family members have not only the right to enter the territory of the Member State, but also the right to obtain an entry visa [18]. This distinguishes them from other third country nationals, who have no such right.

Third country family members should be issued as soon as possible and on the basis of an accelerated procedure with a free of charge short-term entry visa. By analogy with Article 23 of the Visa Code [19] the Commission considers that delays of more than four weeks are not reasonable. The authorities of the Member States should guide the family members as to the type of visa they should apply for, and they cannot require them to apply for long-term, residence or family reunification visas. Member States must grant such family members every facility to obtain the necessary visas. Member States may use premium call lines or services of an external company to set up an appointment but must offer the possibility of direct access to the consulate to third country family members.

As the right to be issued with an entry visa is derived from the family link with the EU citizen, Member States may require only the presentation of a valid passport and evidence of the family link [20] (and also dependency, serious health grounds, durability of partnerships, where applicable). No additional documents, such as a proof of accommodation, sufficient resources, an invitation letter or return ticket, can be required.

Member States may encourage integration of EU citizens and their third country family members by offering language and other targeted courses on a voluntary basis [21]. No consequence can be attached to the refusal to attend them.

Residence cards issued under Article 10 of the Directive to a family member of an EU citizen residing in the host Member State, including those issued by other Member States, exempt their holders from the visa requirement when they travel together with the EU citizen or join him/her in the host Member State.

Residence cards not issued under the Directive can exempt the holder from the visa requirement under Schengen rules [22].

2.2.2. Residence cards

As stipulated in Article 10(1), the right of residence of third country family members is evidenced by the issuing of a document called "Residence card of a family member of a Union citizen". The denomination of this residence card must not deviate from the wording prescribed by the Directive as different titles would make it materially impossible for the residence card to be recognised in other Member States as exempting its holder from the visa requirement under Article 5(2).

The format of the residence card is not fixed, so Member States are free to lay it down as they see fit [23].

However, the residence card must be issued as a self-standing document and not in form of a sticker in a passport, as this could limit the validity of the card in violation of Article 11(1).

The residence card must be issued within six months from the date of application. The deadline must be interpreted in light of Article 10 of the EC Treaty and the maximum period of six months is justified only in cases where examination of the application involves public policy considerations [24].
The list of documents [25] to be presented with the application for a residence card is exhaustive, as confirmed by Recital 14. No additional documents can be requested.

Member States may require that documents be translated, notarised or legalised where the national authority concerned cannot understand the language in which the particular document is written, or have a suspicion about the authenticity of the issuing authority.



2.3. Residence of EU citizens for more than three months

EU citizens have a right of residence in the host Member State if they are economically active there. Students and economically inactive EU citizens must have sufficient resources for themselves and their family members not to become a burden on the social assistance system of the host Member State during their period of residence and have comprehensive sickness insurance cover.

The list of documents to be presented with the application for residence is exhaustive. No additional documents can be requested.

2.3.1. Sufficient resources

The notion of ‘sufficient resources’ must be interpreted in the light of the objective of the Directive, which is to facilitate free movement, as long as the beneficiaries of the right of residence do not become an unreasonable burden on the social assistance system of the host Member State.

The first step to assess the existence of sufficient resources should be whether the EU citizen (and family members who derive their right of residence from him or her) would meet the national criteria to be granted the basic social assistance benefit.

EU citizens have sufficient resources where the level of their resources is higher than the threshold under which a minimum subsistence benefit is granted in the host Member State. Where this criterion is not applicable, the minimum social security pension should be taken into account.

Article 8(4) prohibits Member States from laying down a fixed amount to be regarded as "sufficient resources", either directly or indirectly, below which the right of residence can be automatically refused. The authorities of the Member States must take into account the personal situation of the individual concerned. Resources from a third person must be accepted [26].

National authorities can, when necessary, undertake checks as to the existence of the resources, their lawfulness, amount and availability. The resources do not have to be periodic and can be in the form of accumulated capital. The evidence of sufficient resources cannot be limited [27].

In assessing whether an individual whose resources can no longer be regarded as sufficient and who was granted the minimum subsistence benefit is or has become an unreasonable burden, the authorities of the Member States must carry out a proportionality test. To this end, Member States may develop for example a points-based scheme as an indicator. Recital 16 of Directive 2004/38 provides three sets of criteria for this purpose:

(1) duration
• For how long is the benefit being granted?
• Outlook: is it likely that the EU citizen will get out of the safety net soon?
• How long has the residence lasted in the host Member State?

(2) personal situation
• What is the level of connection of the EU citizen and his/her family members with the society of the host Member State?
• Are there any considerations pertaining to age, state of health, family and economic situation that need to be taken into account?

(3) amount
• Total amount of aid granted?
• Does the EU citizen have a history of relying heavily on social assistance?
• Does the EU citizen have a history of contributing to the financing of social assistance in the host Member State?

As long as the beneficiaries of the right of residence do not become an unreasonable burden on the social assistance system of the host Member State, they cannot be expelled for this reason [28].

Only receipt of social assistance benefits can be considered relevant to determining whether the person concerned is a burden on the social assistance system.

2.3.2. Sickness insurance

Any insurance cover, private or public, contracted in the host Member State or elsewhere, is acceptable in principle, as long as it provides comprehensive coverage and does not create a burden on the public finances of the host Member State. In protecting their public finances while assessing the comprehensiveness of sickness insurance cover, Member States must act in compliance with the limits imposed by Community law and in accordance with the principle of proportionality [29].

Pensioners fulfil the condition of comprehensive sickness insurance cover if they are entitled to health treatment on behalf of the Member State which pays their pension [30].

The European Health Insurance Card offers such comprehensive cover when the EU citizen concerned does not move the residence in the sense of Regulation (EEC) No 1408/71 to the host Member State and has the intention to return, e.g. studies or posting to another Member State.




Citation:


3. Restrictions of the right to move and reside freely on grounds of public policy or public security

This section builds on the Communication of 1999 [31] on the special measures concerning the movement and residence of EU citizens which are justified on grounds of public policy, public security or public health. The content of the 1999 Communication is still generally valid, even if it refers to Directive 64/221, which was repealed by Directive 2004/38. The purpose of this section is to update the content of the 1999 Communication in the light of the recent case-law of the Court and to clarify certain questions raised during the process of the implementation of the Directive.

Freedom of movement for persons is one of the foundations of the EU. Consequently the provisions granting that freedom must be given a broad interpretation, whereas derogations from that principle must be interpreted strictly [32].



3.1. Public policy and public security

Member States may restrict the freedom of movement of EU citizens on grounds of public policy or public security. Chapter VI of the Directive applies to any action taken on grounds of public policy or public security which affects the right of persons coming under the Directive to enter and reside freely in the host Member State under the same conditions as the nationals of that State [33].

Member States retain the freedom to determine the requirements of public policy and public security in accordance with their needs, which can vary from one Member State to another and from one period to another. However, when they do so in the context of the application of the Directive, they must interpret those requirements strictly [34].

It is crucial that Member States define clearly the protected interests of society, and make a clear distinction between public policy and public security. The latter cannot be extended to measures that should be covered by the former.

Public security is generally interpreted to cover both internal and external security [35] along the lines of preserving the integrity of the territory of a Member State and its institutions. Public policy is generally interpreted along the lines of preventing disturbance of social order.

EU citizens may be expelled only for conduct punished by the law of the host Member State or with regard to which other genuine and effective measures intended to combat such conduct were taken, as confirmed by the case-law [36] of the Court.

In any case, failure to comply with the registration requirement is not of such a nature as to constitute in itself conduct threatening public policy and public security and cannot therefore by itself justify the expulsion of the person. [37]



3.2. Personal conduct and the threat

Restrictive measures may be taken only on a case-by-case basis where the personal conduct of an individual represents a genuine, present and sufficiently serious threat affecting one of the fundamental interests of the society of the host Member State [38]. Restrictive measures cannot be based solely on considerations pertaining to the protection of public policy or public security advanced by another Member State [39].

Community law precludes the adoption of restrictive measures on general preventive grounds [40]. Restrictive measures must be based on an actual threat and cannot be justified merely by a general risk [41]. Restrictive measures following a criminal conviction cannot be automatic and must take into account the personal conduct of the offender and the threat that it represents for the requirements of public policy [42]. Grounds extraneous to the personal conduct of an individual cannot be invoked. Automatic expulsions are not allowed under the Directive.[43]

Individuals can have their rights restricted only if their personal conduct represents a threat, i.e. indicates the likelihood of a serious prejudice to the requirements of public policy or public security.

A threat that is only presumed is not genuine. The threat must be present. Past conduct may be taken into account only where there is a likelihood of reoffending [44]. The threat must exist at the moment when the restrictive measure is adopted by the national authorities or reviewed by the courts [45]. Suspension of sentence constitutes an important factor in the assessment of the threat as it suggests that the individual concerned no longer represents a real danger.

Present membership of an organisation may be taken into account where the individual concerned participates in the activities of the organization and identifies with its aims or designs [46]. Member States do not have to criminalize or to ban the activities of an organisation to be in a position to restrict the rights under the Directive, as long as some administrative measures to counteract the activities of that organisation are in place. Past associations [47] cannot, in general, constitute present threat.

A previous criminal conviction can be taken into account, but only in so far as the circumstances which gave rise to that conviction are evidence of personal conduct constituting a present threat to the requirements of public policy [48]. The authorities must base their decision on an assessment of the future conduct of the individual concerned. The kind and number of previous convictions must form a significant element in this assessment and particular regard must be had to the seriousness and frequency of the crimes committed. While the danger of re-offending is of considerable importance, a remote possibility of new offences is not sufficient [49].

A. and I. have finished serving their two year sentence for robbery. The authorities assess if the personal conduct of the two sisters represents a threat, i.e. if it involves the likelihood of a new and serious prejudice to public policy.

This was A.’s first conviction. She behaved well in prison. Since she left prison, she has found a job. The authorities find nothing in her behaviour that represents a genuine, present and sufficiently serious threat.

As for I., this was already her fourth conviction. The seriousness of her crimes has grown over time. Her behaviour in prison was far from exemplary and her two requests to be released on parole were refused. In less than two weeks, she is caught planning another robbery. The authorities conclude that I.'s conduct is a threat to public policy.

In certain circumstances, persistent petty criminality may represent a threat to public policy, despite the fact that any single crime/offence, taken individually, would be insufficient to represent a sufficiently serious threat as defined above. National authorities must show that the personal conduct of the individual concerned represents a threat to the requirements of public policy [50]. When assessing the existence of the threat to public policy in these cases, the authorities may in particular take into account the following factors:

• the nature of the offences;
• their frequency;
• damage or harm caused.

The existence of multiple convictions is not enough, in itself.


3.3. Proportionality assessment

Chapter VI of the Directive cannot be regarded as imposing a precondition to the acquisition and maintenance of a right of entry and residence, but as providing exclusively the possibility to restrict, where justified, the exercise of a right derived directly from the Treaty [51].

Once the authorities have established that the personal conduct of the individual represents a threat that is serious enough to warrant a restrictive measure, they must carry out a proportionality assessment to decide whether the person concerned can be denied entry or removed on grounds of public policy or public security.

National authorities must identify protected interests. It is in the light of these interests that they must carry out an analysis of the characteristics of the threat. The following factors could be taken into account:

• degree of social danger resulting from the presence of the person concerned on the territory of that Member State;
• nature of the offending activities, their frequency, cumulative danger and damage caused;
• time elapsed since acts committed and behaviour of the person concerned

(NB: also good behaviour in prison and possible release on parole could be taken into account).

The personal and family situation of the individual concerned must be assessed carefully with a view to establishing whether the envisaged measure is appropriate and does not go beyond what is strictly necessary to achieve the objective pursued, and whether there are less stringent measures to achieve that objective. The following factors, outlined in an indicative list in Article 28(1), should be taken into account [52]:

• impact of expulsion on the economic, personal and family life of the individual (including on other family members who would have the right to remain in the host Member State);
• the seriousness of the difficulties which the spouse/partner and any of their children risk facing in the country of origin of the person concerned;
• strength of ties (relatives, visits, language skills) – or lack of ties – with the Member State of origin and with the host Member State (for example, the person concerned was born in the host Member State or lived there from an early age);
• length of residence in the host Member State (the situation of a tourist is different from the situation of someone who has lived for many years in the host Member State);
• age and state of health.



3.4. Increased protection against expulsion


EU citizens and their family members who are permanent residents (after five years) in the host Member State can be expelled only on serious grounds of public policy or public security. EU citizens residing for more than after ten years and children can be expelled only on imperative grounds of public security (not public policy). There must be a clear distinction between normal, ‘serious’ and ‘imperative’ grounds on which the expulsion can be taken.
As a rule, Member States are not obliged to take time actually spent behind bars into account when calculating the duration of residence under Article 28 where no links with the host Member State are built.



3.5. Urgency

Under Article 30(3), the time allowed to leave the territory must be at least one month, save in duly substantiated cases of urgency. The justification of an urgent removal must be genuine and proportionate [53]. In assessing the need to reduce this time in cases of urgency, the authorities must take into account the impact of an immediate or urgent removal on the personal and family life of the person concerned (e.g. need to give notice at work, terminate a lease, need to arrange for personal belongings to be sent to the place of new residence, the education of children, etc.). Adopting an expulsion measure on imperative or serious grounds does not necessarily mean that there is urgency. The assessment of urgency must be clearly and separately substantiated.



3.6. Procedural safeguards

The person concerned must always be notified of any measure taken on grounds of public policy or public security, as required by Article 30.
Decisions must be fully reasoned and list all the specific factual and legal grounds on which they are taken so that the person concerned may take effective steps to ensure his or her defence [54] and national courts may review the case in accordance with the right to an effective remedy, which is a general principle of Community law reflected in Article 47 of the EU Charter. In this respect, forms may be used to notify the decisions but must always allow for a full justification of the grounds on which the decision was taken (just indicating one or more of several options by ticking a box is not acceptable).




Citation:


4. Abuse and fraud

Community law cannot be relied in case of abuse [55]. Article 35 allows Member States to take effective and necessary measures to fight against abuse and fraud in areas falling within the material scope of Community law on free movement of persons by refusing, terminating or withdrawing any right conferred by the Directive in the case of abuse of rights or fraud, such as marriages of convenience. Any such measure must be proportionate and subject to the procedural safeguards provided for in the Directive [56].

Community law promotes the mobility of EU citizens and protects those who have made use of it [57]. There is no abuse where EU citizens and their family members obtain a right of residence under Community law in a Member State other than that of the EU citizen’s nationality as they are benefiting from an advantage inherent in the exercise of the right of free movement protected by the Treaty [58], regardless of the purpose of their move to that State [59]. By the same token, Community law protects EU citizens who return home after having exercised their free movement rights.



4.1. Concepts of abuse and fraud

4.1.1. Fraud

For the purposes of the Directive, fraud may be defined as deliberate deception or contrivance made to obtain the right of free movement and residence under the Directive. In the context of the Directive, fraud is likely to be limited to forgery of documents or false representation of a material fact concerning the conditions attached to the right of residence. Persons who have been issued with a residence document only as a result of fraudulent conduct in respect of which they have been convicted, may have their rights under the Directive refused, terminated or withdrawn [60].

4.1.2. Abuse

For the purposes of the Directive, abuse may be defined as an artificial conduct entered into solely with the purpose of obtaining the right of free movement and residence under Community law which, albeit formally observing of the conditions laid down by Community rules, does not comply with the purpose of those rules [61].



4.2. Marriages of convenience

Recital 28 defines marriages of convenience for the purposes of the Directive as marriages contracted for the sole purpose of enjoying the right of free movement and residence under the Directive that someone would not have otherwise. A marriage cannot be considered as a marriage of convenience simply because it brings an immigration advantage, or indeed any other advantage. The quality of the relationship is immaterial to the application of Article 35.

The definition of marriages of convenience can be extended by analogy to other forms of relationships contracted for the sole purpose of enjoying the right of free movement and residence, such as (registered) partnership of convenience, fake adoption or where an EU citizen declares to be a father of a third country child to convey nationality and a right of residence on the child and its mother, knowing that he is not its father and not willing to assume parental responsibilities.

Measures taken by Member States to fight against marriages of convenience may not be such as to deter EU citizens and their family members from making use of their right to free movement or unduly encroach on their legitimate rights. They must not undermine the effectiveness of Community law or discriminate on grounds of nationality.

When interpreting the notion of abuse in the context of the Directive, due attention must be given to the status of the EU citizen. In accordance with the principle of supremacy of Community law, the assessment of whether Community law was abused must be carried out in the framework of Community law, and not with regard to national migration laws. The Directive does not prevent Member States from investigating individual cases where there is a well-founded suspicion of abuse. However, Community law prohibits systematic checks [62]. Member States may rely on previous analyses and experience showing a clear correlation between proven cases of abuse and certain characteristics of such cases.

In order to avoid creating unnecessary burdens and obstacles, it is possible to identify a set of indicative criteria suggesting that there is unlikely to be an abuse of Community rights:

• the third country spouse would have no problem obtaining a right of residence in his/her own capacity or has already lawfully resided in the EU citizen’s Member State beforehand;
• the couple was in a relationship for a long time;
• the couple had a common domicile/household for a long time [63];
• the couple have already entered a serious long-term legal/financial commitment with shared responsibilities (mortgage to buy a home, etc);
• the marriage has lasted for a long time.

Member States may define a set of indicative criteria suggesting the possible intention to abuse the rights conferred by the Directive for the sole purpose of contravening national immigration laws. National authorities may in particular take into account the following factors:

• the couple have never met before their marriage;
• the couple are inconsistent about their respective personal details, about the circumstances of their first meeting, or about other important personal information concerning them;
• the couple do not speak a language understood by both;
• evidence of a sum of money or gifts handed over in order for the marriage to be contracted (with the exception of money or gifts given in the form of a dowry in cultures where this is common practice);
• the past history of one or both of the spouses contains evidence of previous marriages of convenience or other forms of abuse and fraud to acquire a right of residence;
• development of family life only after the expulsion order was adopted;
• the couple divorces shortly after the third country national in question has acquired a right of residence.

The above criteria should be considered possible triggers for investigation, without any automatic inferences from results or subsequent investigations. Member States may not rely on one sole attribute; due attention has to be given to all the circumstances of the individual case. The investigation may involve a separate interview with each of the two spouses.

S., a third country national, was ordered to leave in one month as she had overstayed her tourist visa. After two weeks, she married O., an EU national who had just arrived to the host Member State. The authorities suspect that the marriage might have been concluded only to avoid expulsion. They contact the authorities in O.’s Member State and find out that after the wedding his family shop was finally able to pay a debt of 5000 EUR, which it had been unable to repay for two years.

They invite the newly-weds for an interview, during which they find out that O. has meanwhile already left the host Member State to return home to his job, that the couple is not able to communicate in a common language and that they met for the first time one week before the marriage. There are strong indications that the couple may have married with the sole purpose of contravening national immigration laws.


The burden of proof lies on the authorities of the Member States seeking to restrict rights under the Directive. The authorities must be able to build a convincing case while respecting all the material safeguards described in the previous section. On appeal, it is for the national courts to verify the existence of abuse in individual cases, evidence of which must be adduced in accordance with the rules of national law, provided that the effectiveness of Community law is not thereby undermined [64].

Investigations must be carried out in accordance with fundamental rights, in particular with Articles 8 (right to respect for private and family life) and 12 (right to marry) of the ECHR (Articles 7 and 9 of the EU Charter).

On going investigation of suspected cases of marriages of convenience cannot justify derogation from the rights of third country family members under the Directive, such as the prohibition of the right to work, seizure of passport or dely of the issue of a residence card within six months from the date of application. These rights can be withdrawn at any time as a result of subsequent investigations.



4.3 Other forms of abuse

Abuse could also occur when EU citizens, unable to be joined by their third country family members in their Member State of origin because of the application of national immigration rules preventing it, move to another Member State with the sole purpose to evade, upon returning to their home Member State, the national law that frustrated their family reunification efforts, invoking their rights under Community law.

The defining characteristics of the line between genuine and abusive use of Community law should be based on the assessment of whether the exercise of Community rights in a Member State from which the EU citizens and their family members return was genuine and effective. In such case, EU citizens and their families are protected by Community law on free movement of persons. This assessment can only be made on a case-by-case basis. If, in a concrete case of return, the use of Community rights was genuine and effective, the Member State of origin should not inquire into the personal motives that triggered the previous move.

When necessary, Member States may define a set of indicative criteria to assess whether residence in the host Member State was genuine and effective. National authorities may in particular take into account the following factors:

• the circumstances under which the EU citizen concerned moved to the host Member State (previous unsuccessful attempts to acquire residence for a third country spouse under national law, job offer in the host Member State, capacity in which the EU citizen resides in the host Member State);
• degree of effectiveness and genuineness of residence in the host Member State (envisaged and actual residence in the host Member State, efforts made to establish in the host Member State, including national registration formalities and securing accommodation, enrolling children at an educational establishment);
• circumstances under which the EU citizen concerned moved back home (return immediately after marrying a third country national in another Member State).

The above criteria should be considered possible triggers for investigation, without any automatic inferences from results or subsequent investigations. In assessing whether the exercise of the right to move and reside freely in another Member State of the EU was genuine and effective, national authorities may not rely on a sole attribute but must pay due attention to all the circumstances of the individual case. They must assess the conduct of persons concerned in the light of the objectives pursued by Community law and act on the basis of objective evidence [65].

J. returns home from another Member State with S., his third country spouse. S. unsuccessfuly attempted twice to acquire residence in J.’s Member State. J. continued to work home during his alleged residence in another Member State.

The authorities contact the authorities of the host Member State and find out that J. returned home only after three weeks. The couple stayed in a tourist hotel and paid for the three weeks of accommodation in advance. Taking all of this into account, J. and S. do not benefit from the provisions of the Directive.


It cannot be inferred that the residence in the host Member State is not genuine and effective only because an EU citizen maintains some ties to the home Member State, all the more if his status in the host country is unstable (e.g. a work contract of limited duration). The mere fact that a person consciously places himself in a situation conferring a right does not in itself constitute a sufficient basis for assuming that there is abuse [66].

All relevant considerations set out above on investigation, material and procedural safeguards, co-operation between Member States relating to marriages of convenience apply mutatis mutandis.



4.4. Measures and sanctions against abuse and fraud

Article 35 entitles Member States to adopt the necessary measures in cases of abuse of rights or fraud. These measures can be taken at any point of time and may entail:

• the refusal to confer rights under Community law on free movement (e.g. to issue an entry visa or a residence card);
• the termination or withdrawal of rights under Community law on free movement (e.g. the decision to terminate validity of a residence card and to expel the person concerned who acquired rights by abuse or fraud).

Community law does not at present provide for any specific sanctions Member States may take in the framework of fight against abuse or fraud. Member States may lay down sanctions under civil (e.g. cancelling the effects of a proven marriage of convenience on the right of residence), administrative or criminal law (fine or imprisonment), provided these sanctions are effective, non-discriminatory and proportionate.




Citation:


[1] COM (2008) 840 final

[2] Directive 2004/38/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2004 on the right of citizens of the Union and their family members
to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States

[3] Conclusions of the JHA Council meetings in November 2008 and February 2009

[4] Resolution of the European Parliament of 2 April 2009 on the application of Directive 2004/38/EC (2008/2184(INI))

[5] Cases C-482/01 and C-493/01 Orfanopoulos and Oliveri (paras 97-98) and C-127/08 Metock (para 79)

[6] Cases 139/85 Kempf (para 13) and C-33/07 Jipa (para 23)

[7] Article 3(1)

[8] Cases C-370/90 Singh and C-291/05 Eind

[9] Case C-60/00 Carpenter

[10] Inter alia, Article 16(2) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights or Article 16(1)(b) of the Convention to Eliminate All Forms of Discrimination
Against Women

[11] ECtHR case Alilouch El Abasse v Netherlands (6 January 1992)

[12] Recital 6

[13] Adoptive children are fully protected by Article 8 of the ECHR (ECtHR cases X v Belgium and Netherlands (10 July 19750, X v France (5 October
1982) as well as X, Y and Z v. UK (22 April 1997)).

[14] Cases 316/85 Lebon (para 22) and C-1/05 Jia (paras 36-37)

[15] Emotional dependence is not taken into account, see AG Tizzano in case C-200/02 Zhu and Chen, para 84

[16] The test of dependency should primarily be whether, in the light of their personal circumstances, the financial means of the family members permit
them to live at the minimum level of subsistence in the country of their normal residence (AG Geelhoed in case C-1/05 Jia, para 96).

[17] Cases C-215/03 Oulane (para 53) and C-1/05 Jia (para 41)

[18] Case C-503/03 Commission v Spain (para 42)

[19] COM(2006) 403 final/2

[20] Articles 8(5) and 10(2)

[21] Cf. the Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the
Committee of the Regions on multilingualism: an asset for Europe and a shared commitment (COM (2008) 566).

[22] Article 5 of Regulation (EC) No 562/2006 establishing a Community Code on the rules governing the movement of persons across borders
(Schengen Borders Code)

[23] Council Regulation (EC) No 1030/2002 laying down a uniform format for residence permits for third-country nationals does not apply to family
members of EU citizens exercising their right to free movement (Article 5) and Article 21 of the Convention implementing the Schengen Agreement.

[24] COM(1999)372 (point 3.2)

[25] Article 10(2)

[26] Case C-408/03 Commission v Belgium (para 40 et seq.)

[27] Case C-424/98 Commission v Italy (para 37)

[28] Article 14(3)

[29] Case C-413/99 Baumbast (paras 89-94)

[30] Articles 27, 28 and 28a of Regulation (EEC) No 1408/71 on the application of social security schemes to employed persons, to self-employed
persons and to the members of their families moving within the Community. As of 1 March 2010, Regulation (EC) No 883/04 will replace it but the
same principles will apply.

[31] COM(1999)372

[32] Cases 139/85 Kempf (para 13) and C-33/07 Jipa (para 23)

[33] Cases 36/75 Rutili (paras 8-21) and 30/77 Bouchereau (paras 6-24)

[34] Cases 36/75 Rutili (para 27), 30/77 Bouchereau (para 33) and C-33/07 Jipa (para 23)

[35] Cases C-423/98 Albore (para 18 et seq.) and C-285/98 Kreil (para 15)

[36] Cases 115/81 Adoui and Cornuaille (paras 5-9) and C-268/99 Jany (para 61)

[37] Case 48/75 Royer (para 51).

[38] All criteria are cumulative.

[39] Cases C-33/07 Jipa (para 25) and C-503/03 Commission v Spain (para 62)

[40] Case 67/74 Bonsignore (paras 5-7)

[41] General prevention in specific circumstances, such as sport events, is covered in the 1999 Communication (cfr point 3.3).

[42] Cases C-348/96 Calfa (paras 17-27) and 67/74 Bonsignore (paras 5-7)

[43] Case C-408/03 Commission v Belgium (paras 68-72)

[44] Case 30/77 Bouchereau (paras 25-30)

[45] Cases C-482/01 and C-493/01 Orfanopoulos and Oliveri (para 82)

[46] Case 41/74 van Duyn (para 17 et seq.)

[47] Ibid

[48] Cases C-482/01 and 493/01 Orfanopoulos and Oliveri (paras 82 and 100) and C-50/06 Commission v Netherlands (paras 42-45)

[49] For example, the danger of re-offending may be considered greater in the case of drug dependency if there is a risk of further criminal offences
committed in order to fund the dependency: AG Stix-Hackl in Joined cases C-482/01 and C-493/01 Orfanopoulos and Oliveri

[50] Case C-349/06 Polat (para 35)

[51] Case 321/87 Commission v Belgium (para 10)

[52] In relation to the fundamental rights, see the case-law of the ECtHR in cases Berrehab, Moustaquim, Beldjoudi, Boujlifa, El Boujaidi and Dalia.

[53] AG Stix-Hackl in case C-441/02 Commission v Germany

[54] Case 36/75 Rutili (paras 37-39)

[55] Cases 33/74 van Binsbergen (para 13), C-370/90 Singh (para 24) and C-212/97 Centros (paras 24-25)

[56] Case C-127/08 Metock (paras 74-75)

[57] Cases C-370/90 Singh, C-291/05 Eind and C-60/00 Carpenter

[58] Cases C-212/97 Centros (para 27) and C-147/03 Commission v Austria (paras 67-68)

[59] Cases C-109/01 Akrich (para 55) and C-1/05 Jia (para 31)

[60] Cases C-285/95 Kol (para 29) and C-63/99 Gloszczuk (para 75)

[61] Cases C-110/99 Emsland-Stärke (para 52 et seq.) and C-212/97 Centros (para 25)

[62] The prohibition includes not only checks on all migrants, but also checks on whole classes of migrants (e.g. those from a given ethnic origin).

[63] Community law does not require third country family spouses to live with the EU citizen to qualify for a right of residence – case 267/83 Diatta
(para 15 et seq.).

[64] Cases C-110/99 Emsland-Stärke (para 54) and C-215/03 Oulane (para 56)

[65] Case C-206/94 Brennet v Paletta (para 25)

[66] Case C-212/97 Centros (para 27)



Dernière édition par Admin le Lun 15 Fév - 04:23 (2010); édité 11 fois
Revenir en haut
Publicité






MessagePosté le: Jeu 2 Juil - 18:27 (2009)    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Revenir en haut
Admin


Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 24 Avr 2008
Messages: 1 580

MessagePosté le: Jeu 30 Juil - 14:33 (2009)    Sujet du message: Nouveaux Guidelines de la Commission Européenne sur l'application de la directive 2004/38 sur le droit de vivre en Europe en famille Répondre en citant

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2009:0313:FIN:FR:PDF

COMMISSION DES COMMUNAUTÉS EUROPÉENNES

Bruxelles, le 2.7.2009
COM(2009) 313 final

COMMUNICATION DE LA COMMISSION AU PARLEMENT EUROPÉEN ET AU CONSEIL

concernant les lignes directrices destinées à améliorer la transposition et l'application de la directive 2004/38/CE relative au droit des citoyens de l’Union et des membres de leurs familles de circuler et de séjourner librement sur le territoire des États membres (Texte présentant de l'intérêt pour l'EEE)


1. INTRODUCTION

Le 10 décembre 2008, la Commission a adopté son rapport[1] sur l'application de la directive 2004/38/CE[2], qui donnait un aperçu global de la manière dont la directive était transposée en droit national et était appliquée dans la vie quotidienne.

Il concluait que globalement, la transposition de la directive laissait plutôt à désirer, notamment en ce qui concerne le chapitre VI (qui permet aux États membres de limiter le droit des citoyens de l'UE et des membres de leur famille pour des raisons d'ordre public ou de sécurité publique) et l'article 35 (qui autorise les États membres à adopter les mesures nécessaires pour empêcher les abus et fraudes, tels que les mariages de complaisance) .

La Commission annonçait dans ce rapport son intention d’offrir une aide aux États membres et aux citoyens de l’UE et de mettre des informations à leur disposition en publiant des lignes directrices, au cours du premier semestre de 2009, sur certains sujets dont la transposition ou l’application avait été jugée problématique. Le Conseil[3] et le Parlement européen[4] se sont félicités de cette intention. Ces lignes directrices exposent le point de vue de la Commission et sont sans préjudice de la jurisprudence de la Cour de justice («la Cour») et de son évolution.

La présente communication a pour objet de fournir des orientations aux États membres sur la manière d'appliquer correctement la directive 2004/38/CE du 29 avril 2004 relative au droit des citoyens de l’Union et des membres de leurs familles de circuler et de séjourner librement sur le territoire des États membres, afin d'apporter des améliorations réelles à tous les citoyens européens et de faire de l'Union un espace de sécurité, de liberté et de justice.

Ce rapport mettait également en évidence les problèmes fréquents concernant le droit d’entrée et de séjour des membres de la famille qui sont ressortissants de pays tiers et l’obligation, pour les citoyens de l’UE, de présenter des documents supplémentaires non prévus dans la directive lorsqu’ils introduisent une demande de séjour. La Commission a annoncé dans ce rapport qu'elle intensifierait ses efforts pour garantir une transposition et une mise en œuvre correctes de la directive. Pour y parvenir, elle continuera d'informer les citoyens de l'Union des droits qui leur sont conférés par la directive, notamment en diffusant un guide simplifié à leur intention et en utilisant au mieux l'internet. En outre, la Commission organisera des rencontres bilatérales avec les États membres afin d'examiner les questions liées à la mise en œuvre et à l'application de la directive et recourra pleinement aux pouvoirs qui lui sont conférés par le traité.

De nos jours, plus de huit millions de citoyens de l'Union exercent leur droit de circuler et de séjourner librement et vivent actuellement dans un autre État membre. La libre circulation des citoyens constitue l'une des libertés fondamentales du marché intérieur et se trouve au cœur du projet européen. La directive 2004/38/CE a codifié et revu les instruments communautaires existants en vue de simplifier et de renforcer le droit à la liberté de circulation et de séjour des citoyens de l'Union et des membres de leur famille. À titre d'observation générale, la Commission rappelle que la directive doit être interprétée et appliquée conformément aux droits fondamentaux[5], notamment le droit au respect de la vie privée et familiale, le principe de non-discrimination, les droits de l'enfant et le droit à un recours effectif, tels qu'ils sont garantis dans la convention européenne des droits de l'homme (CEDH) et repris dans la charte des droits fondamentaux de l'UE.

La libre circulation des personnes constituant l'un des fondements de l'Union, les dérogations à ce principe doivent être d'interprétation stricte[6]. Toutefois, le droit à la libre circulation dans l'Union n'est pas illimité et s'accompagne d'obligations pour ses bénéficiaires, ce qui implique de se conformer aux lois du pays d'accueil.


2. CITOYENS DE L'UNION ET MEMBRES DE LA FAMILLE RESSORTISSANTS DE PAYS TIERS : ENTRÉE ET SÉJOUR

La directive[7] ne s’applique qu’aux citoyens de l’Union qui se rendent ou séjournent dans un État membre autre que celui dont ils ont la nationalité, ainsi qu’aux membres de leur famille qui les accompagnent ou les rejoignent.

T., ressortissante de pays tiers, séjourne dans l'État membre d'accueil depuis quelque temps. Elle souhaite que son conjoint, également ressortissant de pays tiers, l'y rejoigne. Étant donné que ni l'un ni l'autre n'est un citoyen de l'Union, le couple ne peut bénéficier des droits énoncés dans la directive, et il appartient au seul État membre concerné de fixer les règles applicables aux ressortissants de pays tiers rejoignant leur conjoint de pays tiers, sans préjudice – le cas échéant – d'autres instruments du droit communautaire.

Les citoyens de l'Union résidant dans l'État membre dont ils ont la nationalité ne bénéficient pas en principe des droits conférés par la législation communautaire relative à la libre circulation des personnes, et les membres de leur famille ressortissants de pays tiers restent soumis à la réglementation nationale en matière d'immigration. Toutefois, les citoyens de l'Union qui rentrent dans leur État membre d'origine après avoir séjourné dans un autre État membre[8] et, dans certains cas, les citoyens de l'Union qui ont exercé leur droit à la libre circulation dans un autre État membre sans y séjourner[9] (par exemple, en fournissant des services dans un autre État membre sans y séjourner) bénéficient également des règles en matière de libre circulation des personnes.

P. réside dans l'État membre dont elle a la nationalité. Il s'y plaît et n'a jamais séjourné dans un autre État membre. S'il souhaite faire venir sa conjointe ressortissante de pays tiers, le couple ne peut bénéficier des droits énoncés dans la directive, et il appartient au seul État membre concerné de fixer les règles en ce qui concerne le droit des conjoints de pays tiers de rejoindre ses nationaux.

Les travailleurs frontaliers sont couverts par le droit communautaire dans les deux pays (en tant que travailleurs migrants dans l'État membre d'emploi et en tant que personnes subvenant à leurs besoins dans l'État membre de résidence) .

2.1. Membres de la famille et autres bénéficiaires

2.1.1. Conjoints et partenaires

Les mariages valablement contractés dans un pays doivent en principe être reconnus aux fins de l'application de la directive. Les mariages forcés , dans lesquels l'une des parties ou les deux sont mariées sans leur consentement ou contre leur volonté, ne sont protégés ni par le droit international[10] ni par le droit communautaire. Il convient d'établir une distinction, d'une part, entre mariages forcés et mariages arrangés , contractés par les deux parties de leur libre et plein consentement, bien qu'un tiers ait déterminé le choix du partenaire et, d'autre part, entre mariages forcés et mariages de complaisance, définis à la section 4.2 ci-dessous.

Les États membres ne sont pas tenus de reconnaître les mariages polygames , contractés légalement dans un pays tiers, qui peuvent être contraires à leur ordre juridique interne[11] , et ce sans préjudice de l'obligation de tenir dûment compte de l'intérêt supérieur des enfants issus de ces mariages.
La directive doit être appliquée dans le respect du principe de non-discrimination inscrit notamment à l'article 21 de la charte de l'UE.

Le partenaire avec lequel un citoyen de l'Union a une relation de fait durable, dûment attestée, est couvert par l'article 3, paragraphe 2, point b). Les personnes dont les droits en vertu de la directive découlent de leur qualité de partenaire durable peuvent être tenues de produire des justificatifs de leur relation avec un citoyen de l'Union et du caractère durable de celle-ci. Cette preuve peut être apportée par tout moyen approprié.

Cette condition de durabilité de la relation doit être appréciée à la lumière de l'objectif de la directive de maintenir l'unité de la famille au sens large du terme[12]. Si les règles nationales sur le caractère durable du partenariat peuvent indiquer une durée minimale à titre de critère pour déterminer si un partenariat peut être considéré comme durable ou non, elles doivent dans ce cas prévoir la prise en considération des autres éléments pertinents ( tels que, par exemple, un emprunt immobilier commun) . Tout refus d'entrée ou de séjour doit être dûment motivé par écrit et doit pouvoir faire l'objet d'un recours.

2.1.2. Membres de la famille directs

Sans préjudice des questions liées à la reconnaissance des décisions des autorités nationales, la notion de descendants et ascendants directs s'étend aux enfants et parents adoptifs[13] ainsi qu'aux mineurs accompagnés d'un tuteur légal permanent. En cas de garde temporaire, les enfants et parents adoptifs peuvent avoir des droits en vertu de la directive, en fonction de la force du lien qui les unit dans le cas d'espèce. Il n'existe aucune restriction quant au degré de parenté. Les autorités nationales peuvent demander aux intéressés d'apporter la preuve du lien de parenté allégué.

Dans la mise en œuvre de la directive, les États membres doivent toujours agir dans le respect de l' intérêt supérieur de l'enfant , ainsi que le prévoit la convention des Nations unies relative aux droits de l'enfant du 20 novembre 1989.

2.1.3. Autres membres de la famille

L'article 3, paragraphe 2, point a), ne prévoit aucune restriction quant au lien de parenté dans le cas des « autres membres de la famille ».

2.1.4. Membres de la famille à charge

Selon la jurisprudence[14] de la Cour, la qualité de membre de la famille « à charge » résulte d'une situation de fait caractérisée par le fait que le soutien matériel [15] de ce membre de la famille est assuré par le citoyen de l'Union ou par son conjoint/partenaire. La qualité de membre de la famille à charge ne présuppose pas un droit à des aliments. Il n'est pas nécessaire de se demander si les membres de la famille concernés seraient, théoriquement, en mesure de subvenir à leurs besoins, par exemple par l'exercice d'une activité rémunérée.

Pour déterminer si des membres de la famille sont à charge, il convient d'apprécier au cas par cas si, compte tenu de leur situation financière et sociale, ils ont besoin d'un soutien matériel pour subvenir à leurs besoins essentiels dans leur pays d'origine ou le pays d'où ils venaient lorsqu'ils ont demandé à rejoindre le citoyen de l'Union (et non dans l'État membre d'accueil où séjourne ce dernier) . Dans ses arrêts sur la notion de dépendance, la Cour ne s'est référée à aucun niveau de vie pour déterminer le besoin de soutien financier devant être apporté par le citoyen de l'Union[16].

La directive ne fixe aucune condition quant à la durée minimale de dépendance ni quant au montant du soutien matériel apporté, tant que la dépendance est réelle et de nature structurelle.

Les membres de la famille à charge sont tenus d'apporter la preuve écrite de leur qualité de personne à charge. Une telle preuve peut être faite par tout moyen approprié, ainsi que l'a confirmé la Cour[17]. Lorsque les membres de la famille concernés sont en mesure d'apporter la preuve de leur dépendance par d'autres moyens qu'une attestation délivrée par l'autorité compétente du pays d'origine ou du pays de provenance, l'État membre d'accueil est tenu de reconnaître leurs droits. Toutefois, le simple engagement du citoyen de l'Union de prendre en charge le membre de la famille concerné ne suffit pas en soi à établir l'existence d'une dépendance.

Conformément à l' article 3, paragraphe 2 , les États membres disposent d'une certaine marge d'appréciation pour fixer les critères d'octroi aux « autres membres de la famille à charge » des droits conférés par la directive. Ils ne jouissent toutefois pas d'une liberté illimitée pour ce faire. Afin de maintenir l'unité de la famille au sens large du terme, la législation nationale doit prévoir un examen minutieux de la situation personnelle des demandeurs concernés, compte tenu de leur lien avec le citoyen de l'Union et d'autres circonstances telles que leur dépendance pécuniaire ou physique envers ce citoyen, ainsi que l'indique le considérant 6.

Toute décision négative est soumise à l'ensemble des garanties matérielles et procédurales de la directive. Elle doit être dûment motivée par écrit et doit pouvoir faire l'objet d'un recours.

2.2. Entrée et séjour des membres de la famille n'ayant pas la nationalité d'un État membre

2.2.1. Visas d'entrée

Ainsi que le prévoit l'article 5, paragraphe 2, les États membres peuvent imposer l'obligation de visa d'entrée aux membres de la famille qui sont ressortissants de pays tiers et qui circulent avec un citoyen de l'Union auquel s'applique la directive ou le rejoignent. Ces membres de la famille ont non seulement le droit d'entrer sur le territoire de l'État membre, mais aussi le droit d'obtenir un visa d'entrée [18], ce qui les différencie des autres ressortissants de pays tiers, qui n'ont pas ce droit.

Un visa de court séjour doit en effet leur être délivré sans frais dans les meilleurs délais et dans le cadre d'une procédure accélérée . Par analogie avec l'article 23 du code des visas[19], la Commission considère qu'un délai de délivrance excédant quatre semaines n'est pas raisonnable. Les autorités des États membres devraient conseiller les membres de la famille quant au type de visa à demander, et ne sauraient leur faire obligation d'introduire une demande de visa de long séjour ou de regroupement familial. Les États membres doivent accorder à ces personnes toutes facilités pour obtenir les visas nécessaires. Si les États membres peuvent recourir à des numéros d'appel surtaxés ou aux services d'une entreprise extérieure pour fixer les rendez-vous, ils doivent donner aux membres de la famille qui sont ressortissants de pays tiers un accès direct au consulat.

Quant au droit d'obtenir un visa d'entrée découlant de l'existence d'un lien de parenté avec le citoyen de l'Union, les États membres ne peuvent exiger que la présentation d'un passeport en cours de validité et d'une preuve de l'existence d'un tel lien [20] (et, le cas échéant, d'une preuve de dépendance, de l'existence de raisons de santé graves ou de l'existence d'une relation durable) . Aucun document supplémentaire, du type attestation d'accueil, preuve de ressources suffisantes, lettre d'invitation ou billet aller-retour, ne peut être exigé.

Les États membres peuvent favoriser l'intégration des citoyens de l'Union et des membres de leur famille qui sont ressortissants de pays tiers en leur proposant des cours de langue ou d'autres cours ciblés non obligatoires[21]. Le refus d'assister à ces cours ne saurait tirer à conséquence.

Les cartes de séjour délivrées en application de l'article 10 de la directive aux membres de la famille d'un citoyen de l'Union séjournant dans l'État membre d'accueil , y compris celles qui sont délivrées par d'autres États membres, exemptent leur titulaire de l'obligation de visa lorsqu'il accompagne le citoyen de l'Union ou le rejoint dans l'État membre d'accueil.

Les cartes de séjour qui ne sont pas délivrées en application de la directive peuvent exempter leur titulaire de l'obligation de visa en vertu du code frontières Schengen[22].

2.2.2. Cartes de séjour

Aux termes de l'article 10, paragraphe 1, le droit de séjour des membres de la famille d'un citoyen de l'Union qui n'ont pas la nationalité d'un État membre est constaté par la délivrance d'un document dénommé « Carte de séjour de membre de la famille d'un citoyen de l'Union ». La dénomination de cette carte de séjour ne doit pas s'écarter du libellé prévu par la directive, car des dénominations différentes rendraient matériellement impossible la reconnaissance de la carte de séjour dans les autres États membres comme document exemptant son titulaire de l'obligation de visa en vertu de l'article 5, paragraphe 2.

Étant donné qu'il n'existe pas de modèle de carte de séjour, les États membres sont libres de l'établir comme ils l'entendent[23]. Toutefois, la carte de séjour doit être délivrée en tant que document distinct et non sous la forme d'une vignette apposée dans le passeport, car cela pourrait limiter la validité de la carte en violation de l'article 11, paragraphe 1.

La carte de séjour doit être délivrée dans les six mois suivant la date de la demande . Ce délai doit être interprété à la lumière de l'article 10 du traité CE et le délai maximal de six mois ne peut se justifier que dans les cas où il y a des raisons précises de vérifier s'il existe des raisons d'ordre public[24].

La liste des documents [25] requis pour la délivrance d'une carte de séjour est exhaustive, ainsi que le confirme le considérant 14. Aucun autre document ne peut être exigé.

Les États membres peuvent demander que des documents soient traduits, notariés ou authentifiés , lorsque l'autorité nationale concernée ne comprend pas la langue dans laquelle ils sont rédigés ou émet des doutes quant à l'authenticité de l'autorité de délivrance.

2.3. Séjour des citoyens de l'Union pendant plus de trois mois

Les citoyens de l'Union ont le droit de séjourner dans l'État membre d'accueil s'ils y exercent une activité économique. Les étudiants et les citoyens de l'Union n'exerçant pas d'activité économique doivent disposer, pour eux et pour les membres de leur famille, de ressources suffisantes afin de ne pas devenir une charge pour le système d’assistance sociale de l’État membre d’accueil au cours de leur séjour, et d’une assurance maladie complète .

La liste des documents requis pour la délivrance d'un titre de séjour est exhaustive. Aucun autre document ne peut être exigé.

2.3.1. Ressources suffisantes

La notion de «ressources suffisantes» doit être interprétée à la lumière de l'objectif de la directive, à savoir faciliter la libre circulation, tant que les bénéficiaires du droit de séjour ne deviennent pas une charge déraisonnable pour le système d'assistance sociale de l'État membre d'accueil.

Pour apprécier l'existence de ressources suffisantes, il convient en premier lieu de se demander si le citoyen de l'Union ( et les membres de sa famille dont le droit de séjour dépend de lui) remplirai(en)t les critères nationaux pour obtenir l' allocation sociale de base .

Les citoyens de l'Union disposent de ressources suffisantes lorsque le niveau de leurs ressources est supérieur au seuil au-dessous duquel une allocation minimale de subsistance est octroyée dans l'État membre d'accueil. Lorsque ce critère ne peut s'appliquer, il convient de tenir compte de la pension minimale de sécurité sociale.

L'article 8, paragraphe 4, interdit aux États membres de fixer, directement ou indirectement, le montant des ressources qu’ils considèrent comme «suffisantes» et au-dessous duquel le droit de séjour peut être automatiquement refusé. Les autorités nationales doivent tenir compte de la situation personnelle de l'intéressé. Les ressources provenant d'un tiers doivent être acceptées[26].

Les autorités nationales peuvent, au besoin, vérifier l'existence, la licéité, le montant et la disponibilité des ressources. Ces ressources ne doivent pas obligatoirement être régulières et peuvent prendre la forme d'un capital accumulé. Les moyens de preuve à cet égard ne peuvent être limités[27].

Afin de déterminer si une personne dont les ressources ne peuvent plus être considérées comme suffisantes et qui a perçu l'allocation minimale de subsistance est devenue une charge déraisonnable , les autorités nationales peuvent procéder à une appréciation de la proportionnalité. Pour ce faire, les États membres peuvent définir, par exemple, un système à points qui leur servira d'indicateur. Le considérant 16 de la directive 2004/38 définit trois séries de critères à cette fin:

(1) La durée
- Pour quelle durée l'allocation est-elle octroyée?
- Prévisions: le citoyen de l'Union est-il susceptible de pouvoir prochainement se passer des prestations d'assistance sociale?
- Depuis combien de temps l'intéressé séjourne-t-il dans l'État membre d'accueil?

(2) La situation personnelle
- Quel est le degré d'intégration du citoyen de l'Union et des membres de sa famille dans la société de l'État membre d'accueil?
- Des considérations particulières (âge, état de santé, situation familiale et économique) doivent-elles être prises en compte?

(3) Le montant
- Quel est le montant total de l'aide accordée?
- Le citoyen de l'Union a-t-il toujours été fort dépendant de l'assistance sociale?
- Le citoyen de l'Union contribue-t-il depuis longtemps au financement de l'assistance sociale dans l'État membre d'accueil?

Les bénéficiaires du droit de séjour ne peuvent faire l'objet d'une mesure d'éloignement pour ce motif, aussi longtemps qu'ils ne deviennent pas une charge déraisonnable pour le système d'assistance sociale de l'État membre d'accueil[28].

Seule la perception de prestations d'assistance sociale peut être considérée comme pertinente pour déterminer si l'intéressé représente une charge pour le système d’assistance sociale.

2.3.2. Assurance maladie

Toute assurance, privée ou publique, souscrite dans l'État membre d'accueil ou ailleurs, est en principe acceptable tant qu'elle prévoit une couverture complète et ne crée pas de charge pour les finances publiques de l'État membre d'accueil. Dans la protection de leurs finances publiques, tout en appréciant l'exhaustivité de la couverture d'assurance maladie, les États membres doivent agir dans le respect à la fois des limitations imposées par le droit communautaire et du principe de proportionnalité[29].

Les titulaires de pensions ou de rentes remplissent la condition de l'assurance maladie complète s'ils ont droit aux soins médicaux au titre de la législation de l'État membre qui leur verse leur pension ou rente[30].

La carte européenne d'assurance maladie confère cette couverture complète lorsque le citoyen de l'Union concerné ne transfère pas sa résidence – au sens du règlement (CEE) n° 1408/71 - sur le territoire de l'État membre d'accueil et a l'intention de retourner dans l'État membre où il réside, par exemple, dans le cas d'études ou d'un détachement dans un autre État membre.


3. LIMITATIONS À L'EXERCICE DU DROIT DE CIRCULER ET DE SÉJOURNER LIBREMENT POUR DES RAISONS D'ORDRE PUBLIC OU DE SÉCURITÉ PUBLIQUE

La présente section développe la communication de 1999[31] sur les mesures spéciales concernant le déplacement et le séjour des citoyens de l'Union qui sont justifiées par des raisons d'ordre public, de sécurité publique ou de santé publique. Le contenu de cette communication reste généralement valable, même s'il renvoie à la directive 64/221 qui a été remplacée par la directive 2004/38. La présente section a pour objet d'actualiser le contenu de la communication de 1999 à la lumière de la jurisprudence récente de la Cour et de clarifier certaines questions soulevées durant la mise en œuvre de la directive.

La libre circulation des personnes constitue l'un des fondements de l'Union. Les dispositions consacrant cette liberté doivent , à ce titre, être interprétées largement , alors que les dérogations à ce principe doivent être, au contraire, d'interprétation stricte[32].

3.1. Ordre public et sécurité publique

Les États membres peuvent restreindre la liberté de circulation des citoyens de l'Union pour des raisons d'ordre public ou de sécurité publique. Le chapitre VI de la directive s'applique à toute mesure prise pour des raisons d'ordre public ou de sécurité publique qui affecte le droit des personnes relevant du champ d'application de la directive d'entrer et de séjourner librement dans l'État membre d'accueil sous les mêmes conditions que les nationaux de cet État[33].

Si les États membres restent libres de déterminer, conformément à leurs besoins nationaux pouvant varier d’un État membre à l’autre et d’une époque à l’autre, les exigences de l’ordre public et de la sécurité publique, il n’en demeure pas moins que, dans le contexte de l'application de la directive, ces exigences doivent être entendues strictement[34].

Il est dès lors essentiel que les États membres définissent clairement les intérêts de la société à protéger et établissent une distinction claire entre ordre public et sécurité publique. Cette dernière ne saurait être étendue aux mesures qui doivent relever de la première.

On entend généralement par «sécurité publique» la sécurité intérieure et extérieure[35] dans le sens de la préservation de l'intégrité du territoire d'un État membre et de ses institutions. On interprète généralement l' «ordre public» dans le sens de la prévention des troubles de l'ordre social.

Des citoyens de l'Union ne peuvent être éloignés du territoire de l'État membre d'accueil qu'en raison d'un comportement donnant lieu à des mesures répressives ou à d'autres mesures réelles et effectives destinées à combattre ce comportement dans cet État, ainsi que le confirme[36] la jurisprudence de la Cour.

En tout état de cause, le non-respect de l’obligation d’enregistrement n'est pas de nature à constituer, en lui-même, un comportement menaçant l'ordre et la sécurité publics et ne saurait dès lors, à lui seul, justifier une mesure d'éloignement[37].

3.2. Comportement personnel et menace

Des mesures restrictives ne peuvent être prises qu'au cas par cas lorsque le comportement personnel de l'intéressé constitue une menace réelle, actuelle et suffisamment grave affectant un intérêt fondamental de la société de l'État membre d'accueil[38]. Des mesures restrictives ne sauraient être fondées exclusivement sur des considérations propres à la protection de l’ordre public ou de la sécurité publique invoquées par un autre État membre[39].

Le droit communautaire exclut l'adoption de mesures restrictives pour des motifs de prévention générale [40]. Les mesures restrictives doivent être fondées sur une menace réelle et ne sauraient être justifiées que par un risque général[41]. Des mesures restrictives à la suite d'une condamnation pénale ne peuvent être automatiques, mais doivent tenir compte du comportement personnel de l'auteur de l'infraction et de la menace qu'il représente pour l'ordre public[42]. Des justifications détachées du comportement personnel de l'intéressé ne sauraient être retenues. Les mesures d’éloignement automatiques ne sont pas autorisées en vertu de la directive[43].

Les droits conférés par la directive ne peuvent être restreints que si le comportement personnel de l'intéressé constitue une menace , c'est-à-dire s'il est susceptible de porter gravement atteinte à l'ordre public ou à la sécurité publique.

Une menace qui n'est que présumée n'est pas réelle . Il doit s'agir d'une menace actuelle . Le comportement passé ne peut être pris en compte qu'en cas de risque de récidive[44]. La menace doit exister au moment où la mesure restrictive est adoptée par les autorités nationales ou appréciée par les juridictions[45]. Le sursis constitue un élément important aux fins de l'appréciation de la menace, car il laisse entendre que la personne concernée ne représente plus un danger réel.

Une affiliation actuelle à une organisation peut être prise en compte lorsque l'intéressé participe aux activités de l'organisation et s'identifie à ses buts et à ses desseins[46]. Les États membres ne sont pas tenus d'incriminer ou d'interdire les activités d'une organisation pour pouvoir restreindre les droits conférés par la directive, tant qu'il existe des mesures administratives pour contrecarrer ces activités. Les affiliations qui ont pris fin dans le passé[47] ne sauraient en général constituer une menace actuelle.

L' existence d'une condamnation pénale peut être prise en compte, mais uniquement dans la mesure où les circonstances qui ont donné lieu à cette condamnation font apparaître l’existence d’un comportement personnel constituant une menace actuelle pour l’ordre public[48]. Les autorités doivent fonder leur décision sur une appréciation du comportement futur de la personne concernée. La nature et le nombre des condamnations doivent constituer un élément important dans cette appréciation, et une attention particulière doit être accordée à la gravité et à la fréquence des infractions commises. S'il est essentiel de tenir compte du risque de récidive, une vague possibilité de nouvelles infractions ne suffit pas[49].

A. et I. ont purgé la peine privative de liberté de deux ans à laquelle elles avaient été condamnées pour vol. Les autorités ont examiné si le comportement personnel des deux sœurs représente une menace, c'est-à-dire s'il est susceptible de porter de nouveau gravement atteinte à l'ordre public.

Il s'agissait de la première condamnation d'A. Elle s'est bien comportée en prison. Elle a trouvé un emploi à sa sortie de prison. Les autorités ne trouvent rien dans son comportement qui constitue une menace réelle, actuelle et suffisamment grave.

Quant à I., il s'agissait déjà de sa quatrième condamnation. La gravité des infractions commises s'est accrue au fil du temps. Son comportement en prison est loin d'avoir été exemplaire et ses deux demandes de libération conditionnelle ont été rejetées. Moins de deux semaines après sa sortie de prison, elle a été arrêtée alors qu'elle s'apprêtait à commettre un nouveau vol. Les autorités en concluent que le comportement d'I. constitue une menace pour l'ordre public.

Dans certains cas, des actes récurrents de petite délinquance peuvent constituer une menace pour l'ordre public, bien qu'une infraction unique, considérée individuellement, ne puisse représenter une menace suffisamment grave, telle que définie plus haut. Les autorités nationales doivent montrer que le comportement personnel de l’intéressé représente une menace pour l’ordre public[50]. Lorsqu'elles cherchent à déterminer s'il existe ou non une menace pour l'ordre public dans ces cas, les autorités peuvent notamment prendre en considération les éléments suivants:

- la nature des infractions;
- leur fréquence;
- le préjudice causé.

L'existence de plusieurs condamnations n'est pas suffisante en soi.

3.3. Appréciation de la proportionnalité

Le chapitre VI de la directive doit être compris non comme une condition préalable posée à l'acquisition et au maintien du droit d'entrée et de séjour, mais uniquement comme ouvrant la possibilité d'apporter, en présence d'une justification appropriée, des restrictions à l'exercice d'un droit directement dérivé du traité[51].

Une fois qu’elles ont établi que le comportement personnel de l’intéressé représente une menace suffisamment grave pour justifier l’adoption d'une mesure restrictive, les autorités doivent procéder à une appréciation de la proportionnalité afin de déterminer si celui-ci peut se voir refuser le droit d’entrée sur le territoire ou en être éloigné pour des raisons d’ordre public ou de sécurité publique.

Les autorités nationales doivent recenser les intérêts à protéger, à la lumière desquels elles doivent analyser les caractéristiques de la menace . Les éléments suivants peuvent entrer en ligne de compte:

- la gravité de la menace que représente pour la société la présence de la personne concernée sur le territoire de l'État membre;
- la nature des infractions, leur fréquence, le risque cumulé et le préjudice causé;
- le temps écoulé depuis la commission des infractions et le comportement de la personne concernée ( N.B.: sa bonne conduite en prison et son éventuelle libération conditionnelle pourraient également être prises en considération ).

Il convient d'évaluer rigoureusement la situation personnelle et familiale de l’intéressé afin de déterminer si la mesure envisagée est adéquate et ne va pas au-delà de ce qui est strictement nécessaire pour réaliser l’objectif visé et s'il existe des mesures moins restrictives pour y parvenir. Les éléments suivants, exposés dans la liste indicative à l'article 28, paragraphe 1, devraient être pris en compte[52]:

- l’incidence de l’éloignement sur la situation économique, personnelle et familiale de l’intéressé ( y compris sur les autres membres de la famille qui auraient le droit de rester dans l’État membre d’accueil );

- la gravité des difficultés auxquelles le conjoint/partenaire et le ou les enfants risquent d'être confrontés dans le pays d'origine de la personne concernée;
- l’intensité des liens ( proches, visites, connaissances linguistiques ) – ou absence de liens – avec l’État membre d’origine et avec l’État membre d’accueil ( par exemple, la personne concernée est née dans l’État membre d’accueil ou y vit depuis son plus jeune âge );
- la durée du séjour dans l’État membre d’accueil ( la situation d’un touriste diffère de celle d’une personne qui vit depuis de nombreuses années dans l’État membre d’accueil );
- l’âge et l’état de santé de l’intéressé.

3.4. Protection renforcée contre l’éloignement

L’État membre d’accueil peut prendre une décision d’éloignement à l’encontre des citoyens de l’Union et des membres de leur famille qui ont acquis un droit de séjour permanent ( au bout de cinq ans ) uniquement pour des raisons impérieuses d’ordre public ou de sécurité publique . Une décision d’éloignement du territoire peut être prise à l'encontre des citoyens de l’Union qui ont séjourné dans l’État membre d’accueil pendant les dix années précédentes et les mineurs uniquement pour des motifs graves de sécurité publique ( et non d’ordre public ). Une nette distinction doit être établie entre les raisons normales, les raisons «impérieuses» et les motifs «graves» sur lesquels peut se fonder une décision d'éloignement.

En règle générale, lorsqu’aucun lien ne s’est tissé avec l’État membre d’accueil, ce dernier n’est pas obligé de tenir compte du temps effectivement passé derrière les barreaux pour calculer la durée du séjour au sens de l’article 28.

3.5. Urgence

L'article 30, paragraphe 3, dispose que le délai imparti pour quitter le territoire de l’État membre ne peut être inférieur à un mois, sauf en cas d' urgenc e dûment justifié. La justification d'un éloignement dans l'urgence doit être proportionnée et reposer sur des éléments réels[53]. Lorsqu’elles évaluent la nécessité de raccourcir ce délai en cas d’urgence, les autorités doivent tenir compte de l’incidence d’un éloignement immédiat ou urgent sur la vie personnelle et familiale de la personne concernée ( p.ex. préavis de démission, résiliation du bail, déménagement, scolarité des enfants, etc. ). L’adoption d’une mesure d’éloignement pour des raisons impérieuses ou des motifs graves n’implique pas nécessairement une situation d’urgence. L’appréciation du caractère d’urgence doit être étayée clairement et séparément.

3.6. Garanties procédurales

Toute décision prise pour des raisons d’ordre public ou de sécurité publique doit toujours être notifiée à l’intéressé, ainsi que le prévoit l’article 30.

Les décisions doivent être dûment motivées et doivent énumérer tous les motifs factuels et juridiques spécifiques sous-jacents en vue de mettre la personne concernée en mesure d’assurer utilement sa défense[54]. Par ailleurs, l’affaire peut être examinée par les juridictions nationales dans le respect du droit à un recours effectif, principe général du droit communautaire repris à l’article 47 de la charte des droits fondamentaux de l’Union européenne. Aux fins de cette notification, des formulaires peuvent être utilisés, mais ceux-ci devront toujours permettre de préciser dûment les motifs sur la base desquels la décision a été prise ( se contenter de cocher une ou plusieurs options dans une liste n'est pas une solution acceptable ).


4. ABUS ET FRAUDE

Les justiciables ne sauraient abusivement ou frauduleusement se prévaloir des normes communautaires [55]. L'article 35 autorise les États membres à adopter des mesures effectives et nécessaires pour lutter contre les abus et fraudes dans les domaines relevant du champ d’application ratione materiæ du droit communautaire en matière de libre circulation des personnes, en refusant, annulant ou retirant tout droit conféré par la directive en cas d'abus de droit ou de fraude, tels que les mariages de complaisance, étant entendu que toute mesure de cette nature doit être proportionnée et soumise aux garanties procédurales prévues dans la directive[56].

La législation communautaire encourage la mobilité des citoyens de l’Union et protège ceux qui en ont fait usage [57]. L’obtention par un citoyen de l’Union et les membres de sa famille d’un droit de séjour en vertu du droit communautaire dans un État membre autre que celui dont il possède la nationalité ne constitue pas un abus étant donné qu’il s’agit d'un avantage inhérent à l'exercice du droit de libre circulation, garanti par le traité[58], quelle que soit la raison de leur installation dans cet État[59]. De même, le droit communautaire protège les citoyens de l’Union qui rentrent chez eux après avoir exercé leur droit à la libre circulation.

4.1. Les notions d’abus et de fraude

4.1.1. Fraude

Aux fins de la directive, la notion de fraude peut être définie comme un acte de tromperie délibéré ou un système inventé pour obtenir le droit de circuler et de séjourner librement en vertu de la directive. Dans le cadre de celle-ci, la fraude se limitera probablement à la falsification de documents ou à la description fallacieuse d’un fait matériel en rapport avec les conditions attachées au droit de séjour. Les personnes qui ont obtenu un titre de séjour uniquement de par leur comportement frauduleux, dont elles ont été reconnues coupables, peuvent voir les droits que leur confère la directive refusés, annulés ou retirés[60].

4.1.2. Abus

Aux fins de la directive, la notion d’ abus peut être définie comme un comportement artificiel adopté dans le seul but d'obtenir le droit de circuler et de séjourner librement en vertu du droit communautaire qui, malgré un respect formel des conditions prévues par la réglementation communautaire, n’atteint pas l’objectif poursuivi par cette réglementation[61].

4.2. Mariages de complaisance

Le considérant 28 définit les mariages de complaisance aux fins de la directive comme des mariages contractés uniquement en vue de bénéficier de la liberté de circulation et de séjour en vertu de la directive, dont la personne concernée n’aurait autrement pas pu bénéficier. Un mariage ne saurait être considéré comme un mariage de complaisance au seul motif qu'il facilite l'immigration, voire procure un quelconque autre avantage. La qualité de la relation n’a aucune incidence sur l’application de l’article 35.

La définition des mariages de complaisance peut être étendue par analogie aux autres formes d’unions contractées dans l’unique but de bénéficier de la liberté de circulation et de séjour, telles que le partenariat (enregistré) de complaisance, l’adoption fictive ou le cas où un citoyen de l’Union reconnaît la paternité d’un enfant de pays tiers afin que celui-ci et sa mère obtiennent la nationalité et un droit de séjour, sachant qu’il n’est pas son père et qu’il n’est pas prêt à assumer les responsabilités parentales.

Les mesures prises par les États membres pour lutter contre les mariages de complaisance ne doivent pas être de nature à dissuader les citoyens de l'Union et les membres de leur famille d'exercer leur droit de circuler librement ou à empiéter indûment sur leurs droits légitimes. Elles ne doivent pas compromettre l’efficacité de la législation communautaire ni entraîner de discriminations fondées sur la nationalité.

Lors de l’interprétation de la notion d’abus dans le cadre de la directive, il convient d’accorder au statut du citoyen de l’Union toute l’attention qui lui est due. Conformément au principe de la primauté du droit communautaire, l’examen de l’éventuel recours abusif à la législation communautaire doit s’effectuer dans le cadre du droit communautaire, et non par rapport à la législation nationale relative à la migration. La directive n’empêche pas les États membres d’ enquêter sur certains cas en particulier en présence de suspicions légitimes d’abus de droit . Cependant, le droit communautaire interdit les contrôles systématiques[62]. Les États membres peuvent se fonder sur des analyses et faits antérieurs démontrant une relation claire entre les cas avérés d’abus et certaines caractéristiques de ces cas.

Afin d’éviter les charges et obstacles inutiles, une série de critères indicatifs suggérant qu'il n’y a probablement pas d’abus de droit communautaire peuvent être recensés:

- le conjoint qui n’a pas la nationalité d’un État membre ne rencontrerait aucune difficulté pour obtenir le droit de séjourner à titre personnel dans l’État membre du citoyen de l’Union ou y a déjà séjourné légalement;
- les intéressés étaient déjà en couple depuis longtemps;
- le couple vit ensemble/est en ménage depuis longtemps[63];
- le couple a déjà pris un engagement juridique/financier important à long terme, avec partage des responsabilités ( emprunt immobilier, etc .);
- les intéressés sont mariés depuis longtemps.
Les États membres peuvent définir une série de critères indicatifs susceptibles de révéler la possible intention d’abuser des droits conférés par la directive dans l'unique but de contrevenir à la législation nationale en matière d'immigration . Les autorités nationales peuvent notamment tenir compte des éléments suivants:
- les conjoints ne se sont jamais rencontrés avant de se marier;
- les conjoints se trompent sur leurs coordonnées respectives, sur les circonstances dans lesquelles ils se sont connus, ou sur d'autres informations importantes à caractère personnel qui les concernent;
- les conjoints ne parlent pas une langue compréhensible par les deux;
- divers éléments prouvent qu'une somme d'argent ou des cadeaux ont été offerts pour que le mariage soit conclu ( à l'exception des sommes ou cadeaux offerts au titre de dot dans les cultures où il s’agit d’une pratique normale );
- l'historique de l'un ou des deux époux fait apparaître des indications sur des précédents mariages de complaisance, d’autres formes d’abus, ainsi que des pratiques frauduleuses pour obtenir le droit de séjour;
- développement d’une vie de famille uniquement après l'adoption de la mesure d'éloignement du territoire;
- les conjoints divorcent peu de temps après l'obtention par le ressortissant de pays tiers en question d'un droit de séjour.

Les critères précités devraient être considérés comme des éléments susceptibles d’entraîner l’ouverture d'une enquête, sans qu'aucune conclusion ne puisse être tirée automatiquement des résultats ou des enquêtes ultérieures. Les États membres ne peuvent se fonder sur une seule caractéristique, mais doivent accorder une attention particulière à toutes les circonstances du cas d’espèce. L’enquête peut comporter un entretien distinct avec chacun des conjoints.

S., ressortissante de pays tiers, se voit ordonner de quitter le territoire dans un mois, son visa touristique étant périmé. Deux semaines plus tard, elle épouse O., ressortissant européen qui vient juste d’arriver dans l’État membre d’accueil. Les autorités soupçonnent que le mariage a été contracté uniquement pour contourner la mesure d’éloignement du territoire. Elles prennent contact avec les autorités de l’État membre d’O., qui leur apprennent qu'après le mariage, le magasin familial a enfin pu rembourser une dette de 5 000 EUR, en souffrance depuis deux ans.

Elles convoquent les jeunes mariés à un entretien au cours duquel elles découvrent qu’O. est, dans l’intervalle, déjà rentré dans son État membre d’origine pour des raisons professionnelles, que les conjoints ne partagent pas de langue commune leur permettant de communiquer et que leur première rencontre date d'une semaine avant le mariage. Les soupçons selon lesquels ils se seraient mariés dans le seul but de contrevenir à la législation nationale en matière d'immigration sont lourds.

La charge de la preuve revient aux autorités des États membres cherchant à restreindre les droits conférés par la directive. Les autorités doivent pouvoir constituer un dossier convaincant dans le respect de toutes les garanties matérielles décrites à la section précédente. En cas de recours, c’est aux juridictions nationales qu’il incombe de vérifier l’existence d’un abus de droit dans différents cas, dont la preuve doit être rapportée conformément aux règles du droit national, pour autant qu'il ne soit pas porté atteinte à l'efficacité du droit communautaire[64].

Les enquêtes doivent être menées dans le respect des droits fondamentaux , en particulier des articles 8 ( droit au respect de la vie privée et familiale ) et 12 ( droit au mariage ) de la CEDH ( articles 7 et 9 de la charte de l'UE ).

Une enquête en cours au sujet d'unions suspectées d'être des mariages de complaisance ne peut justifier une dérogation aux droits des membres de la famille ressortissants de pays tiers prévus par la directive, telle que l'interdiction de travailler, la confiscation du passeport ou la délivrance tardive d'une carte de séjour, au-delà des six mois qui suivent la date de la demande. Les enquêtes ultérieures peuvent donner lieu au retrait de ces droits à tout moment.

4.3. Autres formes d'abus

Des abus sont également susceptibles de se produire lorsqu’un citoyen de l’Union que ne peut rejoindre sa famille originaire d’un pays tiers dans son État membre d'origine, en raison de l'application des règles nationales en matière d'immigration qui interdisent un tel regroupement se rend dans un autre État membre dans l' unique but de contourner, à son retour dans son État membre d'origine, la législation nationale qui a entravé ses tentatives de regroupement familial, invoquant les droits que lui confère la législation communautaire.

Les éléments permettant de distinguer un usage réel d’un usage abusif de la législation communautaire devraient se baser sur l'examen de la question de savoir si l'exercice des droits communautaires dans un État membre dont reviennent les citoyens de l'Union et les membres de leur famille peut être qualifié de réel et effectif . Dans ce genre de situation, les citoyens de l’Union et leur famille sont protégés par la législation communautaire relative à la libre circulation des personnes. Cet examen peut uniquement être effectué au cas par cas. Si, dans un cas concret de retour, l’exercice des droits communautaires était réel et effectif, l'État membre d'origine ne devrait pas s'enquérir des motifs personnels à la base du déplacement précédent.

Si nécessaire, les États membres peuvent définir une série de critères indicatifs afin d’apprécier si le séjour dans l’État membre d’accueil était réel et effectif . Les autorités nationales peuvent notamment tenir compte des éléments suivants:

- les circonstances dans lesquelles le citoyen de l’Union concerné s’est rendu dans l’État membre d’accueil ( déjà plusieurs tentatives infructueuses d'obtenir le droit de séjour pour un conjoint ressortissant d'un pays tiers en vertu de la législation nationale, une offre d'emploi dans l'État membre d'accueil, la qualité dans laquelle le citoyen de l'Union séjourne dans l'État membre d'accueil );
- le caractère effectif et réel du séjour dans l’État membre d’accueil ( séjour prévu et réel dans l'État membre d'accueil, efforts fournis pour s'établir dans l'État membre d'accueil, y compris formalités relatives à l'inscription au registre national et obtention d’un logement, inscription des enfants dans un établissement scolaire );
- circonstances dans lesquelles le citoyen de l’Union concerné est rentré dans son État membre d’origine ( retour immédiatement après s’être marié avec un ressortissant de pays tiers dans un autre État membre ).

Les critères précités devraient être considérés comme des éléments susceptibles d’entraîner l'ouverture d'une enquête, sans qu'aucune conclusion ne puisse être tirée automatiquement des résultats ou des enquêtes ultérieures. Lorsqu’elles évaluent si l'exercice du droit de circuler et de séjourner librement dans un autre État membre de l’Union européenne peut être qualifié de réel et effectif, les autorités nationales ne peuvent pas se fonder sur une seule caractéristique, mais doivent attacher de l'importance à toutes les circonstances du cas d’espèce. Elles doivent examiner le comportement des personnes concernées à la lumière des objectifs poursuivis par le droit communautaire et se fonder sur des éléments objectifs[65].

Après un séjour dans un autre État membre, J. rentre dans son État membre d'origine accompagné de S., son épouse originaire d’un pays tiers. S. a tenté en vain à deux reprises d’obtenir le droit de séjour dans l’État membre de J. Ce dernier a continué à travailler chez lui pendant son prétendu séjour dans un autre État membre.

Les autorités contactent leurs homologues de l’État membre d’accueil et apprennent que J. est rentré chez lui après seulement trois semaines. Le couple a séjourné dans un hôtel de tourisme, auquel il avait réglé les trois semaines à l'avance. Compte tenu de tous ces éléments, J. et S. ne bénéficient pas des dispositions de la directive.

Le seul maintien, de la part d'un citoyen de l’Union, de liens avec l’État membre d’origine, a fortiori si son statut dans le pays d’accueil est précaire ( p.ex. un contrat de travail à durée déterminée ), ne permet pas de conclure que le séjour dans l’État membre d’accueil n’est pas réel et effectif. Le simple fait qu’une personne crée délibérément les conditions lui conférant un droit ne constitue pas en soi une base suffisante pour conclure à un abus[66].

Toutes les considérations pertinentes exposées ci-dessus au sujet des enquêtes, des garanties matérielles et procédurales, et de la coopération entre les États membres concernant les mariages de complaisance s'appliquent mutatis mutandis.

4.4. Mesures et sanctions contre les abus et fraudes

L’article 35 permet aux États membres d’adopter les mesures nécessaires en cas d’abus de droit ou de fraude. Ces mesures peuvent être prises à tout moment et consister à:

- refuser d’accorder les droits prévus par la législation communautaire relative à la libre circulation des personnes ( p.ex. délivrance d’un visa d’entrée ou d’une carte de séjour );
- annuler ou retirer les droits conférés par la législation communautaire relative à la libre circulation des personnes ( p.ex. décision d'annuler la validité d'une carte de séjour et d’éloigner du territoire la personne concernée qui a acquis les droits par abus de droit ou fraude ).

Le droit communautaire ne prévoit pas actuellement de sanctions spécifiques que les États membres pourraient prendre dans le cadre de la lutte contre les abus de droit et fraudes. Ils ont la possibilité d’infliger des sanctions en vertu du droit civil ( p.ex. annulation des effets d'un mariage de complaisance avéré sur le droit de séjour ), administratif ou pénal ( amende ou peine privative de liberté ), pour autant que ces sanctions soient effectives, non discriminatoires et proportionnées.


[1] COM(2008) 840 final.
[2] Directive 2004/38/CE du Parlement européen et du Conseil du 29 avril 2004 relative au droit des citoyens de l'Union et des membres de leurs familles de circuler et de séjourner librement sur le territoire des États membres.
[3] Conclusions des Conseils JAI de novembre 2008 et février 2009.
[4] Résolution du Parlement européen du 2 avril 2009 sur l'application de la directive 2004/38/CE (2008/2184(INI)).
[5] Arrêts dans les affaires jointes C-482/01 et C-493/01, Orfanopoulos et Oliveri, points 97 et 98, et dans l'affaire C-127/08, Metock, point 79.
[6] Arrêts dans les affaires 139/85, Kempf, point 13, et C-33/07, Jipa, point 23.
[7] Article 3, paragraphe 1.
[8] Arrêts dans les affaires C-370/90, Singh, et C-291/05, Eind.
[9] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-60/00, Carpenter.
[10] Entre autres, article 16, paragraphe 2, de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l’homme ou article 16, paragraphe 1, point b), de la convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes.
[11] Arrêt de la CEDH dans l'affaire Alilouch El Abasse c. Pays - Bas ( 6 janvier 1992).
[12] Considérant 6.
[13] Les enfants adoptifs sont pleinement protégés par l'article 8 de la CEDH [arrêts de la CEDH dans les affaires X c. Belgique et Pays-Bas (10 juillet 1975), X c. France (5 octobre 1982), et X, Y et Z c. Royaume-Uni (22 avril 1997)].
[14] Arrêts dans les affaires 316/85, Lebon, point 22, et C-1/05, Jia, points 36 et 37.
[15] La dépendance affective n'est pas prise en compte, voir les conclusions de l'avocat général Tizzano dans l'affaire C-200/02, Zhu et Chen, point 84.
[16] Le critère de dépendance le plus approprié consiste à se demander d’abord si, à la lumière de ces circonstances particulières, les moyens financiers de la personne à charge lui permettent de parvenir à un niveau de vie seulement décent dans le pays où elle réside habituellement (conclusions de l'avocat général Geelhoed dans l'affaire C-1/05, Jia, point 96).
[17] Arrêts dans les affaires C-215/03, Oulane, point 53, et C-1/05, Jia, point 41.
[18] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-503/03, Commission/Espagne, point 42.
[19] COM(2006) 403 final/2.
[20] Article 8, paragraphe 5, et article 10, paragraphe 2.
[21] Cf. la communication de la Commission au Parlement européen, au Conseil, au Comité économique et social européen et au Comité des régions - Multilinguisme: un atout pour l'Europe et un engagement commun (COM(2008) 566).
[22] Article 5 du règlement (CE) n° 562/2006 établissant un code communautaire relatif au régime de franchissement des frontières par les personnes ( code frontières Schengen ).
[23] Le règlement (CE) n° 1030/2002 du Conseil établissant un modèle uniforme de titre de séjour pour les ressortissants de pays tiers ne s'applique pas aux membres de la famille de citoyens de l'Union européenne exerçant leur droit à la libre circulation ( article 5 ).
[24] COM(1999) 372 final ( point 3.2 ).
[25] Article 10, paragraphe 2.
[26] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-408/03, Commission/Espagne (points 40 et suiv.).
[27] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-424/98, Commission/Italie (point 37).
[28] Article 14, paragraphe 3.
[29] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-413/99, Baumbast, points 89 à 94.
[30] Articles 27, 28 et 28 bis du règlement (CEE) n° 1408/71 relatif à l'application des régimes de sécurité sociale aux travailleurs salariés, aux travailleurs non salariés et aux membres de leur famille qui se déplacent à l'intérieur de la Communauté. À partir du 1er mars 2010, le règlement (CE) n° 883/04 le remplacera, mais ce sont les mêmes principes qui s'appliqueront.
[31] COM(1999) 372.
[32] Arrêts dans les affaires 139/85, Kempf, point 13, et C-33/07, Jipa, point 23.
[33] Arrêts dans les affaires 36/75, Rutili, points 8 à 21, et 30/77, Bouchereau, points 6 à 24.
[34] Arrêts dans les affaires 36/75, Rutili, point 27; 30/77, Bouchereau, point 33; et C-33/07, Jipa, point 23.
[35] Arrêts dans les affaires C-423/98, Albore, points 18 et suiv., et C-285/98, Kreil, point 15.
[36] Arrêts dans les affaires 115/81, Adoui et Cornuaille, points 5 à 9, et C-268/99, Jany, point 61.
[37] Arrêt dans l'affaire 48/75, Royer, point 51.
[38] Tous ces critères sont cumulatifs.
[39] Arrêts dans les affaires C-33/07, Jipa, point 25, et C-503/03, Commission/Espagne, point 62.
[40] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-67/74, Bonsignore, points 5 à 7.
[41] La prévention générale dans des circonstances spécifiques, telles que les grands événements sportifs, fait l'objet de la communication de 1999 (cf. point 3.3).
[42] Arrêts dans les affaires C-348/96, Calfa, points 17 à 27, et 67/74, Bonsignore, points 5 à 7.
[43] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-408/03, Commission/Belgique, points 68 à 72.
[44] Arrêt dans l'affaire 30/77, Bouchereau, points 25 à 30.
[45] Arrêt dans les affaires jointes C-482/01 et C-493/01, Orfanopoulos et Oliveri, point 82.
[46] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-41/74, van Duyn, points 17 et suiv.
[47] Ibid.
[48] Arrêts dans les affaires jointes C-482/01 et C-493/01, Orfanopoulos et Oliveri, points 82 et 100, et dans l'affaire C-50/06, Commission/Pays-Bas, points 42 à 45.
[49] Par exemple, le risque de récidive sera plutôt plus élevé en cas de toxicodépendance dans le cadre de laquelle un risque existe que de nouveaux délits soient commis pour en assurer le financement, conclusions de l'avocat général dans les affaires jointes C-482/01 et C-493/01, Orfanopoulos et Oliveri.
[50] Arrêt dans l'affaire C-349/06, Polat, point 35.
[51] Arrêt dans l’affaire 321/87, Commission/Belgique, point 10.
[52] S’agissant des droits fondamentaux, voir la jurisprudence de la CEDH dans les affaires Berrehab, Moustaquim, Beldjoudi, Boujlifa, El Boujaidi et Dalia.
[53] Conclusions de l’avocat général Stix-Hackl dans l'affaire dans l’affaire C-441/02 Commission/Allemagne .
[54] Arrêt dans l’affaire 36/75, Rutili, points 37 à 39 .
[55] Arrêts dans les affaires 33/74, van Binsbergen, point 13, C-370/90, Singh, point 24, et C-212/97, Centros, points 24 et 25.
[56] Arrêt dans l’affaire C-127/08, Metock, points 74 et 75.
[57] Arrêts dans les affaires C-370/90 Singh, C-291/05, Eind, et C-60/00, Carpenter .
[58] Arrêts dans les affaires C-212/97, Centros, point 27, et C-147/03, Commission/Autriche, points 67 et 68.
[59] Arrêts dans les affaires C-109/01, Akrich, point 55, et C-1/05, Jia, point 31.
[60] Arrêts dans les affaires C-285/95, Kol, point 29, et C-63/99, Gloszczuk, point 75.
[61] Arrêts dans les affaires C-110/99, Emsland-Stärke, points 52 et suivants, et C-212/97, Centros, point 25.
[62] L’interdiction porte non seulement sur les contrôles de tous les migrants, mais également sur ceux de catégories entières de migrants (p.ex. d'une certaine origine ethnique).
[63] Le droit communautaire n’exige pas du conjoint originaire d’un pays tiers de vivre avec le citoyen de l’Union pour pouvoir bénéficier d'un droit de séjour - affaire 267/83, Diatta, points 15 et suivants.
[64] Arrêts dans les affaires C-110/99, Emsland-Stärke, points 54 et suivants, et C-251/03, Oulane, point 56.
[65] Arrêt dans l’affaire C-206/94, Brennet/Paletta, point 25.
[66] Arrêt dans l’affaire C-212/97, Centros, point 27


Revenir en haut
Contenu Sponsorisé






MessagePosté le: Aujourd’hui à 06:01 (2017)    Sujet du message: Nouveaux Guidelines de la Commission Européenne sur l'application de la directive 2004/38 sur le droit de vivre en Europe en famille

Revenir en haut
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    Franco-Etrangers Index du Forum -> couples et familles binationales -> La lutte entre les Etats membres et les Institutions Européennes sur le respect du droit de vivre en Europe en famille Toutes les heures sont au format GMT + 2 Heures
Page 1 sur 1

 
Sauter vers:  

Index | Creer un forum | Forum gratuit d’entraide | Annuaire des forums gratuits | Signaler une violation | Conditions générales d'utilisation
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com